yeast
MADE EASY

Get to know what yeast is and how it’s best used, and you’ll be breaking into fresh-baked goods in no time.

what is yeast

Packaged yeast is a home baker’s secret for consistent, reliable fresh-baked goods. Yeast is also what gives bread its signature, “bready” smell.

Yeast is a living microorganism in the fungi family that feeds off of carbohydrates or simple sugars.

Yeast is a living microorganism in the fungi family that feeds off of carbohydrates or simple sugars. As it feeds, it kickstarts fermentation, releasing carbon dioxide that expands gluten proteins, causing dough to expand and rise. info-graphic

As it feeds, it kickstarts fermentation, releasing carbon dioxide that expands gluten proteins, causing dough to expand and rise.

GREAT BAKED GOODS BALANCE THESE BASICS:

Temperature

Moisture

Starch, Carbs & Sugars

Time

temperature

Temperature

Yeast can thrive in the right warm temperature or be dormant or “killed” in the wrong temperature.

For best results, follow the temperature recommendations for the type of yeast used in your recipe.

100°–110°F is the ideal temperature for Active Dry Yeast.

120°–130°F is the ideal temperature for RapidRise® and Bread Machine Yeast.

moisture

Moisture

Liquids help bloom the yeast, and the right moisture levels can dictate a bread’s final texture.

starch

Starch, Carbohydrates & Sugars

This is what feeds the yeast! Yeast digests carbohydrates and ferments, releasing carbon dioxide which gives bread its distinctive flavor.

time

Time

Know how much time you have and choose recipes from there. Some breads take a few extra stages, but most recipes for rolls, pizza and loaves can be made quickly.

Sticking to the rest-and-rise times noted in the chosen recipe is important as under- or over-proofing your dough can affect the final result.

temperature

Yeast can thrive in the right warm temperature or be dormant or “killed” in the wrong temperature.

For best results, follow the temperature recommendations for the type of yeast used in your recipe.

100°–110°F is the ideal temperature for Active Dry Yeast.

120°–130°F is the ideal temperature for RapidRise® and Bread Machine Yeast.

temperature

Liquids help bloom the yeast, and the right moisture levels can dictate a bread’s final texture.

temperature

This is what feeds the yeast! Yeast digests carbohydrates and ferments, releasing carbon dioxide which gives bread its distinctive flavor.

temperature

Know how much time you have and choose recipes from there. Some breads take a few extra stages, but most recipes for rolls, pizza and loaves can be made quickly.

Sticking to the rest-and-rise times noted in the chosen recipe is important as under- or over-proofing your dough can affect the final result.

yeast substitutions, storage & guides

To use Active Dry Yeast in place of RapidRise® Yeast…

Use 25% more Active Dry Yeast as RapidRise® Yeast called for in the recipe.

Proof in warm liquid (100°–110°F) for five minutes before combining with dry ingredients.

Add 20 minutes to the rise time to allow dough to fully double in size.


To use RapidRise® Yeast in place of Active Dry Yeast…

Add an equal amount of RapidRise® Yeast to dry ingredients.

Heat wet ingredients to 120°–130°F.

Add yeast to dry ingredients.

Replace first rise with a 10-minute rest after kneading.

Proceed with shaping, rising and baking as directed in recipe.


To use fresh yeast in place of Active Dry Yeast…

Remember that one packet of dry yeast is equivalent to one small (0.6-ounce) cake of fresh yeast. One large (2-ounce) cake is equivalent to three packets of dry yeast.

Crumble into dry ingredients or dissolve in tepid water (70°–90°F).

Proceed with first rise, shaping, second rise and baking as directed in the recipe.


To use Active Dry Yeast in place of fresh yeast…

Remember that one package of dry yeast is equivalent to one small (0.6-ounce) cake of fresh yeast. One large (2-ounce) cake is equivalent to three packets of dry yeast.

Dissolve each packet of Active Dry Yeast in ¼ cup warm water (100–110°F) and proceed with your recipe as it is written. Subtract the water used to dissolve the yeast from the total amount of liquid called for in the recipe.


Instant Yeast, Bread Machine Yeast and RapidRise® Yeast can be used interchangeably.

1 packet of yeast = 2-¼ teaspoons

2 packets of yeast = 4-½ teaspoons

3 packets of yeast = 6-¾ teaspoons

Most yeasts in a package can be stored at room temperature, with the exception of fresh yeast, which should be refrigerated.

For best results, use by the date on the package.

For better shelf life of any yeast, consider storing in the refrigerator. For best results, do not store fresh yeast in the freezer.

Generally, sealed packages of dry yeast can last around two years, with the exception of fresh yeast that’s best used within several weeks of purchase.

Keep opened jars in the fridge for up to four months.

The “use by” date on the package is a good indicator, but you can also proof yeast to check that it’s still active. Here’s how:

Get ¼ cup warm water (lukewarm, 100°–110°F).

Sprinkle yeast over top and stir to dissolve.

Stir in 1 teaspoon of sugar.

Wait 10 minutes.

Active, living yeast will bubble or foam and double in size.

If yeast is still active, you can proceed with your recipe.

Breads were originally made using sourdough starters — a mixture of grain and water allowed to ferment for days or even years, using only wild yeasts from the surrounding environment that must constantly be fed. Each has their benefit, and many bakers work with both to give their breads a great rise and delicious flavor.


Some of our bread recipes feature a “poolish” or “sponge” which are pre-fermentations of dough that can give artisan and sourdough breads that also include Fleischmann’s® Yeast a punch of sourdough-style flavor.


YEAST SOURDOUGH STARTER
Ease & Time Ready to go from the package Requires continuous daily feeding to keep wild yeasts active
Flavor Delicious bready flavor for a variety of baked goods Tangy flavor great for artisan breads and pizzas
Rising Reliable results; RapidRise® Yeast usually requires one rise, depending on the recipe Variable; always requires rise
Final Texture Consistent texture More open with some irregularity
Great for Beginners Yes Depends on level of commitment

about Fleischmann’s® yeast

Yeasts are everywhere — naturally found in soil, on plants and even in the air. While there are many strains of yeast, Fleischmann’s® Yeast is Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This is the most common yeast used in baking.

From the growth of one single cell to as many cells as can fill a multi-story building, the yeast-making process is amazing. Purity of the yeast is ensured at every step. The process of yeast making can be broken down into three stages:

1 - Production

An active Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell is selected under a microscope.

Cell is planted in a sterile test tube with nutrients to help it multiply.

Yeast cells are transferred to sterile laboratory flasks where they feed off a nutrient-rich wort, made of molasses (or another carbohydrate source), vitamins, minerals and other ingredients.


2 - Fermentation

Yeast cells are transferred into sterilized fermentation tanks, containing more nutrient-rich wort.

Yeast is transferred to increasingly larger tanks up to the final tank which holds up to 60,000 gallons.

Yeast is ready to be harvested when it has multiplied 5-8 times, over three generations!


3 - Separation

Fully fermented yeast is repeatedly washed

Yeast is rapidly spun in a centrifuge to separate yeast from nutrients.

The result is a creamy suspension of pure, active yeast that is further processed based on desired final product.

yeast substitutions, storage & guides

To use Active Dry Yeast in place of RapidRise® Yeast…

Use 25% more Active Dry Yeast as RapidRise® Yeast called for in recipe

Proof in warm liquid (100°–110°F) for five minutes before combining with dry ingredients

Add 20 minutes to the rise time to allow dough to fully double in size


To use RapidRise® Yeast in place of Active Dry Yeast…

Add equal amount of RapidRise® Yeast to dry ingredients

Heat wet ingredients to 120°–130°F

Add yeast to dry ingredients

Replace first rise with a 10-minute rest after kneading

Proceed with shaping, rising and baking as directed in recipe


To use fresh yeast in place of Active Dry Yeast…

Remember that one packet of dry yeast is equivalent to one small (0.6-ounce) cake of fresh yeast. One large (2-ounce) cake is equivalent to three packets of dry yeast

Crumble into dry ingredients or dissolve in tepid water (70°–90°F)

Proceed with first rise, shaping, second rise and baking as directed in recipe


To use Active Dry Yeast in place of fresh yeast…

Remember that one package of dry yeast is equivalent to one small (0.6-ounce) cake of fresh yeast. One large (2-ounce) cake is equivalent to three packets of dry yeast.

Dissolve each packet of Active Dry Yeast in ¼ cup warm water (100–110°F) and proceed with your recipe as it is written. Subtract the water used to dissolve the yeast from the total amount of liquid called for in the recipe.


Instant Yeast, Bread Machine Yeast and RapidRise® Yeast can be used interchangeably.

1 packet of yeast = 2¼ teaspoons

2 packets of yeast = 4½ teaspoons

3 packets of yeast = 6¾ teaspoons

Most yeasts in a package can be stored at room temperature, with the exception of fresh yeast which should be refrigerated.

For best results, use by the date on the package.

For better shelf life of any yeast, consider storing in the refrigerator. For best results, do not store fresh yeast in the freezer.

Generally, sealed packages of dry yeast can last around two years, with the exception of fresh yeast that’s best used within several weeks of purchase.

Keep opened jars in the fridge for up to four months.

The “use by” date on the package is a good indicator but you can also proof yeast to check that it’s still active. Here’s how:

Get ¼ cup warm water (lukewarm, 100°–110°F)

Sprinkle yeast over top and stir to dissolve

Stir in 1 teaspoon of sugar

Wait 10 minutes

Active, living yeast will bubble or foam and double in size

If yeast is still active, you can proceed with your recipe

Breads were originally made using sourdough starters — a mixture of grain and water allowed to ferment for days or even years, using only wild yeasts from the surrounding environment that must constantly be fed. Each has their benefit and many bakers work with both to give their breads a great rise and delicious flavor.


Some of our bread recipes feature a “poolish” or “sponge” which are pre-fermentations of dough that can give artisan and sourdough breads that also include Fleischmann’s® Yeast a punch of sourdough-style flavor.


YEAST SOURDOUGH STARTER
Ease & Time Ready to go from the package Requires continuous daily feeding to keep wild yeasts active
Flavor Delicious bready flavor for a variety of baked goods Tangy flavor great for artisan breads and pizzas
Rising Reliable results; RapidRise® Yeast usually requires one rise, depending on the recipe. Variable; always requires rise
Final Texture Consistent texture More open with some irregularity
Great for Beginners Yes Depends on level of commitment

about Fleischmann’s® yeast

Yeasts are everywhere — naturally found in soil, on plants and even in the air. While there are many strains of yeast, Fleischmann’s® Yeast is Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This is the most common yeast used in baking.

From the growth of one single cell to as many cells as can fill a multi-story building, the yeast-making process is amazing. Purity of the yeast is ensured at every step. The process of yeast making can be broken down into three stages:

1 - Production

An active Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell is selected under a microscope.

Cell is planted in a sterile test tube with nutrients to help it multiply.

Yeast cells are transferred to sterile laboratory flasks where they feed off a nutrient-rich wort, made of molasses (or another carbohydrate source), vitamins, minerals and other ingredients.


2 - Fermentation

Yeast cells are transferred into sterilized fermentation tanks, containing more nutrient-rich wort.

Yeast is transferred to increasingly larger tanks up to the final tank which holds up to 60,000 gallons.

Yeast is ready to be harvested when it has multiplied 5-8 times, over three generations!


3 - Separation

Fully fermented yeast is repeatedly washed.

Yeast is rapidly spun in a centrifuge to separate yeast from nutrients.

The result is a creamy suspension of pure, active yeast that is further processed based on desired final product.